Jazz Catalogue A to I

Home ** Jazz J to Z

Abbey Lincoln - Straight Ahead Abbey Lincoln - Straight Ahead This is one of Abbey Lincoln's greatest recordings. It is a testament to the credibility of her very honest music (and her talents) that Lincoln's sidemen on this date include the immortal tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins, who takes a memorable solo on "Blue Monk", Eric Dolphy on flute and alto, trumpeter Booker Little (whose melancholy tone is very important in the ensembles), pianist Mal Waldron and drummer Max Roach (her husband from 1962 to 1970). This is another in Pure Pleasure's Candid Series, featuring reissues from an incredible label that met its demise some 40 years ago. The American Candid label has achieved a near legendary status among the critics and the International jazz and blues public. The series was born in 1960 when Archie Bleyer, owner of the Cadence label decided to indulge his love of jazz and blues and create his own line - called Candid. Archie approached Nat Hentoff - a likeable and knowledgeable critic, author and journalist active in New York at the time. Hentoff accepted the challenge of producing the albums and history was made. However, the label went out of business in 1961 and remained that way for a quarter of a century. Then Alan Bates acquired the masters and renamed his Black Lion Productions company Candid. Bates made the Candid titles available again on CD. These Candid titles were very well recorded and the performances generally are stunning. Great sound and music. "If you drew a line with Ella, Dianne Reeves et al on one side and Nina Simone, Billie Holiday and the like on the other, Lincoln firmly sides with the latter: jazz singing with negligible pop or crossover content. This 1961 session with geniuses like Eric Dolphy, Coleman Hawkins and Booker Little is a stunner. Its subtlety begs for vinyl playback." – Hi Fi News
Annie Ross - A Gasser Annie Ross - A Gasser Although best known as a member of the vocalese supergroup Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, the great jazz singer Annie Ross' solo albums are gems unto themselves and "A Gasser!" from 1959 is the finest of them all. Miss Ross is in peak vocal form here and is joined by the great Zoot Sims on saxophone and much of the same band featured on the Lambert, Hendricks & Ross classic "The Swingers." Don't expect any of the vocal acrobatics of the Lambert, Hendricks & Ross recordings however. This is straight-ahead jazz singing by one of the great singers in her prime.
Annie Ross - Sings a Song of Mulligan Annie Ross - Sings a Song of Mulligan Singer Annie Ross' first solo album after joining Lambert, Hendricks & Ross finds her at the peak of her powers. Ross is joined by two versions of the Gerry Mulligan Quartet with either Chet Baker or Art Farmer on trumpet, Bill Crow or Henry Grimes on bass and drummer Dave Bailey. Annie Ross is at her best (and most appealing) on "I've Grown Accustomed To Your Face," "Give Me The Simple Life," "How About You" and "The Lady's In Love With You," but all of the selections are quite rewarding and her interplay with baritonist Mulligan is consistently memorable.
Art Farmer, Jim Hall - Big Blues Art Farmer, Jim Hall -  Big Blues Flugelhornist Art Farmer and guitarist Jim Hall had a regular group for a time in the mid-'60s but (except for one occasion) had not played together since, until this 1978 LP. This is an unusual effort for CTI in that it is a quintet set without added horns, strings or keyboards. Farmer and Hall are joined by vibraphonist Mike Mainieri, bassist Michael Moore and drummer Steve Gadd for two standards, the title cut and a jazz adaptation of a piece by Ravel. Since Farmer and Hall have long had very complementary styles (both being lyrical, harmonically advanced and thoughtful in their improvisations), it is little surprise that this set is a complete success. Side One 45 RPM, Side Two 33 RPM
Ben Webster - Atmosphere for Lovers and Thieves Ben Webster - Atmosphere for Lovers and Thieves "Ben is still a whale of a tenor player, his approach for the ballads being as poignant and lyrical as ever. On such romantic tunes as 'My Romance' and 'What's New,' that breathy tone and broad-beamed phrasing are well in evidence, whilst the underlying humor and swing are more to the fore in the more muscular 'Easy to Love.'…Nothing ever drags, the pulse is always strong and the accompaniments well suited to Webster's lustrous, lusty blowing." – Jazz Journal, 1971
Betty Carter - Now It’s My Turn Betty Carter - Now It’s My Turn Arguably the most adventurous female jazz singer of all time, Betty Carter was an idiosyncratic stylist and a restless improviser who pushed the limits of melody and harmony as much as any bebop horn player. The husky-voiced Carter was capable of radical, off-the-cuff re-workings of whatever she sang, abruptly changing tempos and dynamics, or rearranging the lyrics into distinctive, off-the-beat rhythmic patterns.
Billie Holiday - Lady Day Billie Holiday - Lady Day

This collection of classic jazz interpretations by Billie Holiday features all-star accompaniments from various sessions from 1935 to 1937. Tracks 5 & 6 on Side A and tracks 4 & 5 on side B were taken from Billie's first and fifth sessions under her own name.

Booker Ervin - That's It Booker Ervin - That's It Booker Ervin, who always had a very unique sound on the tenor, is heard in prime form on this quartet set. In virtually all cases, the jazz and blues musicians who recorded for Candid in 1960-61 (during its original brief existence) were inspired and played more creatively than they did for other labels. That fact is true for Ervin, even if he never made an indifferent record. In addition to "Poinciana" and "Speak Low," Ervin's quartet (which was a regular if short-lived group) performs four of the leader's originals; best known is "Booker's Blues."
Booker Little - Out Front Booker Little - Out Front The brilliant young post-bop trumpeter Booker Little is heard here accompanied by an all-star band, including the saxophonist Eric Dolphy, the bassist Ron Carter and the drummer Max Roach, on a set that combines elements of bop and cool jazz, as well as Little's own imaginative flourishes, which display an authority and potential far beyond his mere 23 years.
Buck Clayton - How Hi The Fi Buck Clayton - How Hi The Fi

The Buck Clayton LP How Hi The Fi was the first issue in 1954 from the famous Buck Clayton jam sessions. It was recorded at Columbia's 30th Street Studios, which was one of the greatest recording sites in the world (the studio has since been abandoned, which must be one of the most stupid decisions executed by the corporate record industry), with a sound that's still instantly recognizable. These Buck Clayton jam sessions were among the first large scale projects to utilize the potential of the new LP technology. The exciting music on this long-out-of-print LP is now available again on 180-gram vinyl, with the cuts "How Hi The Fi" and "Blue Moon" being the most memorable. Buck and fellow musicians are all in inspired form. The most memorable soloists are the rambunctious Trummy Young, the harmonically advanced chordings of Jimmy Jones and an exuberant Woody Herman who was rarely heard in this type of jam session setting. With Clayton having worked out some ensemble riffs for the horns beforehand and plenty of space left for spontaneity, this music is timeless magic.

Budd Johnson & Earl Hines - Mr. Bechet Budd Johnson & Earl Hines - Mr. Bechet "First choice goes without hesitation to Pure Pleasure's reissue of Mr. Bechet on 180 gram vinyl. Why pick this fairly obscure title given such a wealth of choices this year? First, the sound is absolutely wonderful. Budd Johnson's tenor and soprano saxophone sound is lush, sexy and exquisite. And forget paying high prices for Earl Hines on M&K, and listen to his piano sound on this disc. From a sonic perspective this is the best new thing to hit my turntable this year. Second, I'm a sucker for soprano sax. Third, the music swings like crazy. And finally, I'd never even seen this record before. The original Black & Blue issue never crossed my path, but I can't believe it sounds any better than this marvelous reissue." – Dennis D Davis, Hi-Fi+, Record of the Year, 2007 Saxophonist Budd Johnson didn't record much, which makes this 1974 set with the great Earl Hines all the more interesting. Of course, the real reason it's special is because of some damn-fine music by some outstanding jazzmen. Johnson and Hines are joined by drummer Panama Francis and bassist Jimmy Leary. The title tracks is an original tribute to the king of soprano saxophonists Sidney Bechet.
Cab Calloway - Hi De Hi De Ho Cab Calloway - Hi De Hi De Ho [Produced by: Joe Reisman Recorded in RCA Victor’s Studio A, New York City Recording engineer: Bob Simpson & Ernest Oelrich Re-mastering by: Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London In that wistful, screwball age that was the Thirties, one man, practically single-handed, launched an era of musical nonsense that had the whole nation humming bits of rhythmic fol-de-rol. It was Cab Calloway, the Hi-De-Ho man in cream colored tails who gyrated to the point of actually flying while leading his band, and who sang slightly insane ditties (as well as the leading hit songs of the day) in a remarkably rich and resonant baritone. The Cab was one of that group of leaders of the 1930’s who, although playing no musical instrument, collected a fine band and a completely personal style. In this album, Cab has freshly recorded a dozen of his biggest hits of former years, taking full advantage of the most modern high fidelity recording techniques. In so many ways Cab symbolized that whole era of “The Jumpin’ Jive” when people needed something to “make you nine feet tall when you’re four feet five….”. Excerpt from original 1960 sleeve notes by Dom Cerulli (co-editor of The Jazz Word)
Charles Mingus - Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus Charles Mingus - Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus "Charles Mingus has a fascinating way of offering music that is grounded in tradition while remaining startlingly original. The freshness of a piece like Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus has the effect of rendering much of what passes for jazz as tedious. The band is small for Mingus and includes Eric Dolphy on alto saxophone and bass clarinet, Ted Curson on trumpet and Dannie Richmond on drums. It would be one of Dolphy and Curson's last recording dates with the artist, and they seem determined to go all out for it. The leader's bass line kicks off 'Folk Forms No. 1,' followed by Dolphy outlining the melody, and then joined by Curson. A simple riff develops into a lively New Orleans funeral march that's developed for 12 minutes. 'Original Faubus Fables' is serious in intent - a political attack on segregation governor Faubus - but Mingus and Richmond's singing is difficult to listen to with a straight face. Still, this doesn't distract from the wonderful music. Again and again, the elasticity of the sound is fascinating, at once spacious with the bass and drums balanced against the brass and then noisy, with the horns wailing and crying. The last two pieces, 'What I Love?' and the outrageously titled 'All the Things Could Be by Now if Sigmund Freud's Wife Was Your Mother,' are much looser, bordering on free jazz. The album accomplishes what the best of Mingus accomplishes: the perfect tension between jazz played as an ensemble and jazz played as totally free." - Review by Ronnie Lankford, Jr "…This record is required listening for any lover of jazz, even those who are generally shy of the more avant-garde sound of Dolphy mixed with the creative genius that always defined Mingus. It is a classic that deserves a place on the shelf along side of more accessible and better-known Columbia classics Mingus Ah Um and Mingus Dynasty…The original Candid pressings were first rate, and this re-issue combines all the strengths of the original with a better mastering chain and superior vinyl." Recording = 9/10; Music = 10/10 – Dennis Davis, Hi-Fi+, Issue 42
Charles Mingus - Let My Children Hear Music Charles Mingus - Let My Children Hear Music "From his deathbed in Mexico in 1979 Charles Mingus sent a message to Sy Johnson (who was responsible for many of the arrangements on the album), saying that Let My Children Hear Music was the record he liked most from his career. Although Mingus' small-group recordings are the ones most often cited as his premier works, this album does, in fact, rank at the top of his oeuvre and compares favorably with the finest large-ensemble jazz recordings by anyone, including Ellington." - All Music Guide
Charles Mingus and His Jazz Groups - Mingus Dynasty Charles Mingus and His Jazz Groups - Mingus Dynasty

"…the set is a blast from start to finish and so far I've found it impossible to play a single track without enjoying the full set. And whilst it'll never be the classic that its predecessor has become, this remains a great example of the genius of Mingus – and in this superb issue a lasting joy." Recording = 9.5/10; Music = 9.5/10 – Dave Davies, Hi-Fi+, Issue 56 Mingus Dynasty, like its predecessor and Columbia companion Mingus Ah Um, was recorded in 1959, a watershed year for the insuperable, eruptive bassist-composer Charles Mingus. Leading what amounted to a repertory company comprising some of New York's best and most creative improvisers, Mingus musically challenged two ensembles as they'd never been challenged before. The music herein remains as arresting as the LP's original cover photograph of a mock-imperious Mingus in full Chinese emperor regalia was eye-catching.

2 x LPs

Chet Baker - Chet Baker & Crew Chet Baker - Chet Baker & Crew The numbers heard on Chet Baker & Crew were among a prolific flurry of recordings Baker was involved in during the last week of July 1956 - fresh from an extended European stay. The crew on these sides includes Phil Urso (tenor sax), Bobby Timmons (piano), Jimmy Bond (bass), Peter Littman (drums) and of course Baker (trumpet/vocals). Joining the combo on both the original as well as the alternate take of "To Mickey's Memory" and "Pawnee Junction" is Bill Loughbrough (chromatic tympani). His unmistakable percussive accents and tuned drum solos give these West Coast bop tracks uniquely Polynesian intonations. This LP reissue of Chet Baker & Crew increases the original eight-song Pacific Jazz collection to include all 14 tracks complete during three sessions in late July 1956 at the Forum Theater in Los Angeles. (2 LPs)
Chet Baker - Chet Baker & Strings Chet Baker - Chet Baker & Strings "Just six years after Columbia Records introduced the 33 1/3 LP (in 1948), the label unveiled another successful innovation: a trumpet-and-strings album by Chet Baker. Baker proved especially appropriate for this setup due to the lyrical, singing quality of his playing. Chet Baker With Strings features various arrangers including Johnny Mandel, Marty Paich, Shorty Rogers and Jack Montrose. Included is Cole Porter's 'I Love You' arranged by Mandel." - Jazziz Magazine
Chet Baker & Art Pepper - Picture of Heath Chet Baker & Art Pepper - Picture of Heath (formerly titled Playboys) This is the same album as the famous and highly-collectable Playboys record - the one with the pinup model on the cover. However, for legal reasons, Pure Pleasure was not allowed to use that name or cover shot for this reissue. But the music remains... The renamed title, Picture of Heath, comes from the fact that more than half of the tracks here are Jimmy Heath compositions. These are the third sessions to feature the dynamic duo of Art Pepper (alto sax) and Chet Baker (trumpet). The supporting cast here includes Curtis Counce on bass, Phil Urso on tenor sax, Carl Perkins on piano and Larance Marable on drums. These high energy sides are perfect both for bop connoisseurs and mainstream jazz fans. This is another in Pure Pleasure's Candid Series, featuring reissues from an incredible label that met its demise some 40 years ago. The American Candid label has achieved a near legendary status among the critics and the International jazz and blues public. The series was born in 1960 when Archie Bleyer, owner of the Cadence label decided to indulge his love of jazz and blues and create his own line - called Candid. Archie approached Nat Hentoff - a likeable and knowledgeable critic, author and journalist active in New York at the time. Hentoff accepted the challenge of producing the albums and history was made. However, the label went out of business in 1961 and remained that way for a quarter of a century. Then Alan Bates acquired the masters and renamed his Black Lion Productions company Candid. Bates made the Candid titles available again on CD. These Candid titles were very well recorded and the performances generally are stunning. Great sound and music. "Picture of Heath – recorded in 1956 as Playboys, then forced into a title change (Hugh Hefner threatened to sue) – finds Pepper teamed with trumpeter Chet Baker, and it's one of those 'West Coast' jazz recordings that you sit back and let hit you like an ocean wave; up-tempo, fleet-fingered, straight-ahead, and swinging-till-you-drop. The artists make an appealing pair. Baker blows his trumpet with a piercing zest that will startle those who know only his warmed-over Miles-styled balladry. Pepper drapes a smooth, gorgeous tone over a jagged cadence and rhythm – holding a note for a bit too long, then jumping and zigzagging to catch up – and the tension practically crackles." – Fred Kaplan, The Absolute Sound, March 2006
Clark Terry - Color Changes Clark Terry - Color Changes "This is one of flugelhornist Clark Terry's finest albums. Terry had complete control over the music and, rather than have the usual jam session, he utilized an octet and arrangements by Yusef Lateef, Budd Johnson and Al Cohn. The lineup of musicians lives up to its potential, and the charts make good use of the sounds of these very individual stylists. The material, which consists of originals by Terry, Duke Jordan, Lateef and Bob Wilber, is both rare and fresh, and the interpretations always swing." – All Music Guide
Count Basie and His Orchestra - Kansas City Suite- The Music Of Benny Carter Count Basie and His Orchestra - Kansas City Suite- The Music Of Benny Carter

These two 1960 sessions gave Benny Carter a unique chance to write a full program for Count Basie's orchestra. Arranged as a type of suite, the 10 originals pay tribute to the various Kansas City clubs that were active in the '30s when Basie was a resident. The band swings throughout as usual, with concise solos adding color to this memorable modern session.

Dexter Gordon Quartet - Manhattan Symphonie Dexter Gordon Quartet - Manhattan Symphonie From the opening notes of the classic ballad "As Time Goes By," we are fully aware that we're in the presence of a master. The tone is luminous; the placement of the notes, impeccable; the feeling profoundly affecting. More than almost any other improviser of his caliber, Gordon understands exactly why "the fundamental things apply." This expanded issue of Manhattan Symphonie includes two bonus tracks: Thelonious Monk's lustrous "Ruby my Dear" and a previously unreleased on vinyl rendition of "Secret Love," a Gordon favorite. In addition to the acclaimed writer Pete Hamill's wonderful original liner notes, there is a lovely reminiscence from pianist George Cables. (2 LPs)
Duke Ellington - Ellington Uptown Duke Ellington - Ellington Uptown Recorded in December 1951 and 1952, Ellington Uptown joins stunning, extended works of recent vintage ("A Tone Parallel to Harlem," "The Liberian Suite," "The Controversial Suite") with fresh looks at such bona fide classics by Ellington and alter ego Billy Strayhorn, as well as "Perdido," co-written by longtime star valve trombone soloist Juan Tizol.
Duke Ellington and His Orchestra - Such Sweet Thunder Duke Ellington and His Orchestra - Such Sweet Thunder pThe music counts among Ellington's most well-realized "concept projects," all inspired by Shakespeare's work and filled with memorable melodies and ample opportunities for solos by Cat Anderson, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves and Quentin Jackson. The Ellington-Strayhorn compositions treat their soloists like actors doing scenes, and, in effect, playing parts.
     
Duke Ellington - The Nutcracker Suite Duke Ellington - The Nutcracker Suite "This is a no brainer. Do you really need a sales note for this LP? Stop a second and put on your thinking cap. Duke Ellington plays Tchaikovsky. I play this at my Christmas party every year and you should see my guests groove out to this. It's amazing how swinging and sexy the Nutcracker Suite can sound. 'Sugar Rum Cherry' (Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy) sounds like strip tease music. I was down to my boxer shorts before my mother walked into the living room. In fact I play this long after the holidays have passed. A real gem!" - Johnny Zhivago
Duke Ellington and Count Basie - First Time! Count Meets the Duke Duke Ellington and Count Basie - First Time! Count Meets the Duke The musical event which is presented in this album is without precedent in the history of jazz. History largely consists of chronicling momentous occasions and it was such an occasion when the full orchestras of Duke Ellington and Count Basie recorded together on July 6, 1961. The result is almost an embarrassment of riches. It is great in significance, great in musical content and, above all, great in demonstrating the two famous leaders' mutual appreciation and understanding of each other. At first glance this collaboration should not have worked. The Duke Ellington and Count Basie orchestras had already been competitors for 25 years but the leaders' mutual admiration (Ellington was one of Basie's main idols) and some brilliant planning made this a very successful and surprisingly uncrowded encounter. On most selections Ellington and Basie both play piano (their interaction with each other is wonderful) and the arrangements allowed the stars from both bands to take turns soloing. 1. Battle Royal 2. To you 3. Take the 'A' Train 4. Until I Met you 5. Wild Man 6. Segue in C 7. B D B 8. Jumpin' at the Woodside Be the first to write a review for this item OR just rate it
Ella Fitzgerald - Newport Jazz Festival Live At Carnegie Hall Ella Fitzgerald - Newport Jazz Festival Live At Carnegie Hall STEREO Re-mastering by: Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London This is a wonderful live album. Recorded toward the end of Ella's career, by concert's end it is apparent that she has about lost her voice, but not the audience's adoration. The album showcases her in various settings: with the (obviously) reconstituted Chick Webb Orchestra, with Ellis Larkins, with Joe Pass and with Tommy Flanagan (of course); the album also has some nods to the Webb Orchestra, noteworthy for late-career blowing by "Lockjaw" Davis. Highlights: "Nice Work If You Can Get It," "Good Morning Heartache" (an intended and most worthy tribute to Lady Day), "Miss Otis Regrets," the first encore of "Some of these Days," and intended set-ender of Ella doing what she does best, scatting through "Lemon Drop." Recorded July 5th 1973 at Carnegie Hall Produced by John Hammond & Teo Macero Concert producer: Norman Granz Recording engineers: Stan Tonkel
Georgie Fame - Cool Cat Blues Georgie Fame - Cool Cat Blues On Cool Cat Blues in 1990 Ben Sidran assembled some of the coolest jazz cats around to record on an album with the famed Georgie Fame. Among these is jazz drumming giant Steve Gadd, percussionist Ralph MacDonald, bassist Will Lee, blues guitarist Robben Ford, legendary jazz vocalist Mr. Jon Hendricks, pop icon Boz Scaggs and Irish soul king Van Morrison. Apart from the great selection of vocal standards, there is a revamp of Georgie's "Yeah Yeah," a dynamic version of Van's "Moondance" and "It Should Have Been Me." (2 LPs)
Gil Evans - New Bottle Old Wine Gil Evans - New Bottle Old Wine "…For years I've enjoyed my mono original and I sniffed a bit when I saw Pure Pleasure had remastered the stereo tapes. How wrong I was! This is a true stereo recording and an outstanding one at that, which I prefer to the mono. Highest recommendation." Recording = 10/10; Music = 10/10 – Dennis D. Davis, Hi-Fi+, Issue 52 If you have admired Gil Evans' arrangements on the Miles Davis recordings, you owe it to yourself to check this out. These recordings help make the case that Gil Evans was one of the great jazz arrangers of all time. Gil Evans always manages to communicate with sophistication and nuance, and on these sessions he manages to have fun as well. This is a LP of Gil Evans rearranging classic jazz standards like "St. Louis Blues," "King Porter Stomp" and "Lester Leaps." It's an LP you can enjoy as a peek into modern jazz of the late '50s, or as a set of very interesting big band orchestrations.
Harry 'Sweets' Edison & Earl Hines - Earl Meets Harry Harry 'Sweets' Edison & Earl Hines - Earl Meets Harry "Leave it to European labels like Black & Blue to come up with inspired pairings of musicians who American labels never seem to get around to considering. This 1978 meeting between pianist Earl Hines and trumpeter Harry "Sweets" Edison is a match of masters, covering tunes they had likely performed hundreds of times in their respective careers. Everything seems to gel in the opening track, a strident take of 'I Cover The Waterfront,' with plenty of trills by Hines in support of Edison's brilliant open horn…There is nothing like two veterans at the top of their game joining forces for a record date." – All Music Guide
Illinois Jacquet - God Bless My Solo Illinois Jacquet - God Bless My Solo "Jacquet's big tenor sax sound comes on strong from the first beat and never lets up in this outstanding release from the French Black & Blue label…great sound married to a terrific performance. Every cut is outstanding…Pure Pleasure has done a good job of selecting a little known gem, mastering it well and pressing it on pristine Pallas vinyl. This is one of their best releases." Recording = 9/10; Music = 9/10 – Dennis D. Davis, Hi-Fi+, Issue 58 The solo referred to in the title, God Bless My Solo, is that in "Flying Home," which Illinois Jacquet made into a Decca Records microphone in May 1942. This solo became one of the two or three most influential solos in all of jazz history, an 80-second masterpiece. Nearly every tenor player who followed made it a priority to learn that solo, note for note. But "Flying Home" marked neither the beginning nor the end of Jacquet's seven-decade career. He was one of jazz's great survivors, thought of as an outrageous musician when he was young but hailed as a classic figure in old age. He was as effective with romantic jazz ballads as he was with the explosive performances with which he made his reputation. Jacquet is heard in top form throughout this quartet set, recorded for the French Black & Blue label, whilst touring throughout Europe in the 1970s.
Irene Kral - Where Is Love Irene Kral - Where Is Love "…a classic set originally cut for the Choice label, a program of ballads exquisitely interpreted by singer Irene Kral and pianist Alan Broadbent. The tempos are all quite slow, but the emotional yet cool intensity given by Kral and Broadbent means that there are no slow moments. Among the songs given definitive and memorable treatment are Blossom Dearie's 'I Like You, You're Nice' and Bob Dorough's 'Love Came On Stealthy Fingers,' 'Never Let Me Go,' and especially 'Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most.'" – All Music Guide

Home ** Jazz J to Z

Quality Records... plus Website